Fit Body Boot Camp: a Profitable Franchise under $200K

With 317 franchised-owned gyms in the US, Fit Body Boot Camp is one of the largest fitness chains. There’s a good reason for that too: it’s a very affordable fitness franchise.

Indeed, you would need to invest (only) $198,000 on average to own a Fit Body Boot Camp, much lower than the average required investment for fitness franchises ($1.6 million).

But is this worth the profits? How much profits can you realistically make with a Fit Body Boot Camp franchise after all?

In this article we are looking at Fit Body Boot Camp from the perspective of its latest Franchise Disclosure Document. We will look into its financials to find out how much it really costs, how much profits you can realistically make and whether you should invest in it. Let’s dive in!

Key stats

Franchise fee$49,600
Royalty fee5.0%
Marketing fee$12,000
Investment (mid-point)$198,000
Revenue$167,000 per year
Revenue per square foot[franchise_value_revenue_per_sq_ft]
Sales to investment ratio0.8x
Payback period[franchise_value_investment_payback]
Minimum net worth$100,000
Minimum liquid capital$65,000

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What is Fit Body Boot Camp?

Fit Body Boot Camp is a franchise of fitness clubs headquartered in Chino Hills, California.

The club was founded in 2009 by Bedros Keuilian.

Fit Body Boot Camp studios offer 30-minute workouts that include warm-ups and cool-downs and utilize high-intensity interval training, which involves cycles of cardio, strength and resistance training.

It began franchising in 2011 and currently has over 355 fitness clubs worldwide, with 317 in the US.

Fit Body Boot Camp franchises pros and cons

The Pros:

  • Site selection and construction: Fit Body Boot Camp helps franchisees find a viable business location through its trusted partner, Catalyst Commercial Group. In addition, the franchisor helps franchisees with lease negotiations, club designs, construction plus approved equipment vendors and selection.
  • Exclusive territory protection: The franchisor provides the franchisees with exclusive territories to operate in. As long as the agreement is in place, it does not authorize any other franchises in the development market or itself to run parallel Fit Body Boot Camp studios.
  • Added revenue opportunities: The brand has well-structured income streams to help franchisees stand out and improve their earnings. These include apparel, supplements and FBBC workouts.
  • Marketing and publicity: Fit Body Boot Camp employs a dedicated marketing strategy to help franchisees create service awareness. Franchisees can make use of proven national media, social media advertising, regional advertising, targeted promotional campaigns and advertising tools.
  • Simple business concept: The Fit Body Boot Camp gym sessions utilize simple equipment to provide members with impact-driven workouts. Franchisees can get started quickly with fewer inventory requirements and costs.
  • Detailed trailed training: The franchisor provides its franchisees with intensive classroom and on-the-job training to learn about FBBC systems, operations and management. Extensive and ongoing support: Fit Body Boot Camp has experienced and professional management, resources and infrastructure to help new franchise owners establish and build their fitness centers. It helps them with networks, advice, growth insights, ongoing business coaching and periodic reviews.
  • Third-party financing: The franchisor offers financing through third parties. Franchisees get funding for the franchise fee, payroll, equipment and inventories.
  • Allows absentee ownership: The franchise offers investors a passive investment opportunity. Franchisees can run the business alongside other obligations.

The cons:

  • Strong competition: Fit Body Boot Camp faces stiff competition from other fitness franchises such as Anytime Fitness, CycleBar and Gold’s Gym.
  • Not a part-time business: The Fit Body Boot Camp franchise cannot be run on a part-time basis. Franchisees must adhere to the franchisors’ working hours.
  • Not a home-based business: The franchise cannot be run from home or a vehicle. The franchisor requires franchisees to have an office space, warehouse, or retail facility.

How much does a Fit Body Boot Camp franchise cost?

On average, you may need to invest around $198,350 to open a new Fit Body Boot Camp franchise. 

The investment amount is an average and it depends on many factors. It will change based on the fitness club’s size, location, etc. According to the latest Franchise Disclosure Document, the investment ranges between $165,100 and $231,600.

Fit Body Boot Camp startup costs

The initial investment covers all the startup costs you may need to start a Fit Body Boot Camp franchised fitness center.

You need to pay an initial franchise fee of $49,600 to the franchisor. In addition to that, the investment amount covers other startup cost. For example: training expenses, real estate and improvements, computer system, opening inventory, insurance, grand opening launch advertising and the first 3 to 6 months working capital, etc.

Here’s the complete breakdown of the startup costs:

Type of costLow High
Initial Franchise Fee$49,600$49,600
Formation Costs$70,000$113,000
Initial Marketing$5,000$8,000
Operating Costs$40,500$61,000
Total$165,100$231,600
Source: Franchise Disclosure Document 2022

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What is the revenue of a Fit Body Boot Camp?

On average, a Fit Body Boot Camp franchise makes $167,364 in sales per year. 

Although there is a huge drop in yearly sales (-23% revenue growth vs 2020), we can not guarantee that the average sales numbers are correct. Because Fit Body Boot Camp does not provide revenue per franchise in its FDD. So we computed the average sales by dividing the total sales by the total number of franchises in respective years. 

In terms of revenue per square foot, Fit Body Boot Camp franchised gyms generates ~$61 revenue per square foot per year (2,750 square feet on average) which is in line with fitness franchises as per our own fitness benchmarks ($80).

How profitable is a Fit Body Boot Camp franchise?

We estimate that a Fit Body Boot Camp franchise makes about $57,000 in profits per year (34% EBITDA margin).

This profit margin is on the higher end compared to similar franchises (~30% industry average).

Note that Fit Body Boot Camp does not provide a detailed profit and loss including all types of costs a franchisee incurs to operate their business. It only provides royalty and marketing fees. Instead we had to use assumptions for other costs to estimate EBITDA as shown below.

Profit and lossAmount% revenueNote
Revenue$167,364100%
Staff$(46,862)28%industry average
Rent$(29,121)17%industry average
Royalty fee$(11,715)7%as per FDD
Marketing$(8,368)5%industry average
Other Opex$(16,736)10%industry average
EBITDA$56,90834%
Source: Franchise Disclosure Document 2022

Should you invest in a Fit Body Boot Camp franchise?

So are the profits investing in a Fit Body Boot Camp franchise you may ask? To answer this question we must look at the payback period: the time it takes for an investment (like investing in a franchise) to repay itself with the profits it generates.

In general, fitness franchises have payback periods of about 8 years.

The good news with Fit Body Boot Camp is that its payback is 7.8 years: in other words you would repay your investment (and creditors like a bank or investors) within 8 years on average.

As such, we do consider Fit Body Boot Camp is a great investment if you want to get into the fitness franchise business.

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How does it compare vs. other fitness franchises?

FranchiseNet worth ($)Liquid capital ($)Investment ($)Revenue ($)Payback (years)
Anytime Fitnesshttps://sharpsheets.io/blog/anytime-fitness-franchises-costs-profits/350,000175,000510,165338,810$6810.0
Planet Fitnesshttps://sharpsheets.io/blog/planet-fitness-franchises-costs-profits/3,000,0001,500,0003,273,3001,564,877$8013.9
Orangetheory Fitnesshttps://sharpsheets.io/blog/orangetheory-fitness-franchises-costs-profits/1,000,000300,0001,381,432805,251$24411.4
Club Pilateshttps://sharpsheets.io/blog/club-pilates-franchises-costs-profits/500,000100,000287,000544,703$3633.5
Pure Barrehttps://sharpsheets.io/blog/pure-barre-franchises-costs-profits/500,000100,000335,812259,534$1738.6
Snap Fitnesshttps://sharpsheets.io/blog/snap-fitness-franchises-costs-profits/750,000250,000783,328194,124$3726.9
Burn Boot Camphttps://sharpsheets.io/blog/burn-boot-camp-franchises-costs-profits/300,000150,000314,846400,526$765.2
Crunch Fitnesshttps://sharpsheets.io/blog/crunch-fitness-franchises-costs-profits/2,000,000400,0003,092,0001,863,627$4811.1
CycleBarhttps://sharpsheets.io/blog/cyclebar-franchises-costs-profits/500,000100,000417,410335,855$1688.3
Stretch Zonehttps://sharpsheets.io/blog/stretch-zone-franchises-costs-profits/250,000150,000161,027357,632$2863.0
Workout Anytimehttps://sharpsheets.io/blog/workout-anytime-franchises-costs-profits/500,000175,0001,519,450511,628$4910.0
Fitness Togetherhttps://sharpsheets.io/blog/fitness-together-franchises-costs-profits/175,00080,000292,013400,000n.a.4.9
The Camp Transformation Centerhttps://sharpsheets.io/blog/camp-transformation-center-franchise-costs-profits/100,00075,000287,000495,067$993.9
Retro Fitnesshttps://sharpsheets.io/blog/retro-fitness-franchises-costs-profits/1,500,000300,0001,681,341998,459$667.0
F45 Traininghttps://sharpsheets.io/blog/f45-training-franchise-costs-profits/300,000100,000457,650632,902$2534.8
Gold's Gymhttps://sharpsheets.io/blog/golds-gym-franchise-costs-profits/1,000,000400,0004,043,8751,638,000$4716.5
Fit Body Boot Camphttps://sharpsheets.io/blog/fit-body-boot-camp-franchise-costs-profits/100,00065,000198,350167,364$617.9

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